It's About Them

Young People … Our Greatest Resource

Why Bother? (Dr. James Sutton)

The great lyricist Oscar Hammerstein accepted the invitation of a friend to take a plane ride around New York Harbor in a small two-seater. The trip included a flight right over the Statue of Liberty. They flew so close, in fact, that the two clearly saw the top of Lady Liberty’s head.

What they saw amazed them. Every lock and every braid of hair on the top of her head was perfectly formed, detailed and polished. It was every bit as complete as the rest of her face, arms, body and gown.

Hammerstein and his friend came to the same conclusion in almost the same instant. The Statue of Liberty was erected in 1886, before there were airplanes. Who would ever see the top of her head, so why would anyone bother to finish that part of the sculpture rising over three hundred feet above sea level?

Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, the creature of the statue, could very easily have saved months of toil and much expense by cutting corners on the part of the statue that no one would ever see, anyway. He elected, however, to leave nothing unfinished.

In staying true to his task, he left us with two legacies: the Statue of Liberty and a model for taking pride in a job well-done.

(Source: “The Spellbinder’s Gift” by Og Mandino; New York: Ballantine Books, 1995)

Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, the creature of the statue, could very easily have saved months of toil and much expense by cutting corners on the part of the statue that no one would ever see, anyway. He elected, however, to leave nothing unfinished.

In staying true to his task, he left us with two legacies: the Statue of Liberty and a model for taking pride in a job well-done.

(Source: “The Spellbinder’s Gift” by Og Mandino; New York: Ballantine Books, 1995)

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October 13, 2018 Posted by | Communication, family, Human Interest, Inspirational, Integrity | , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Maturity: It’s Not About Age

A friend shared this brief quote from Ann Landers. I must caution you; it’s powerful.

“Maturity is the ability to do a job whether or not you are supervised, to carry money without spending it, and to bear an injustice without wanting to get even.”  Ann Landers

You know, you could search for months and not find a better definition. And it’s NOT about age. A 16-year old can be mature and a 61-year-old immature by this definition.

And we’ve seen both, haven’t we?  

Here’s what I got from Ann Landers’ definition of maturity in terms of how it affects instruction to our children:

1. An agreement to do something, whether it’s to build a house or take out the trash, is a binding promise. Why should we have to be supervised to start and finish a job we promised?

2. Money is a tool, and there are places to keep tools until we need them. If we want our tools to last, we take care of them.

3. Those who rise to the top in this world know how to manage their anger and frustration. It’s the sign of a civilized person. Sometime we take injustices very personally when they weren’t intended that way at all. Wisdom is accumulated in recognizing the difference.

 Thank you, Mrs. Landers, for some wise thoughts.

James D. Sutton, Psychologist     www.docspeak.com  

January 26, 2008 Posted by | adversity, Educators, family, Inspirational, Parents, Self-esteem | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment